a welfare worker and a saint

The woman who is working on my Dad’s medical assistance case felt bad about what I’ve been going through with Dad’s landlord and the bizarre regulations imposed by the state on the children of parents in nursing homes.
So, she pleaded my case to their in-house legal council and they came up with a plan that protects me from the landlord and complies with the state’s regulations to approve Dad for Medicaid.

This woman went way above and beyond all expectations. She should be canonized.

I am so relieved!

*happy happy dance*

Advertisements

10 responses to “a welfare worker and a saint

  • mouseworks

    Yeah for this social worker
    I’m still croggled that your landlord was such a dick. Seems like if he’s having trouble filling his vacancies, perhaps the word has gotten around that he is a problem.
    Some social workers (I knew people like this in Virginia) do go above and beyond.

    Like

    • brni

      Re: Yeah for this social worker
      The reason he has vacancies is because he’d rather collect money from people who don’t live there (i.e. don’t require someone to come in and fix things, don’t require painting and other such expenses) than finding new tenants. As long as the revenue is coming in, he’ll leave them vacant.

      Like

      • mouseworks

        Re: Yeah for this social worker
        He deserves squatters.

        Like

      • lsaboe

        Re: Yeah for this social worker
        ooooooo….squatters…..

        Like

      • dan_ad_nauseam

        Re: Yeah for this social worker
        I take it Pennsylvania is not a duty to mitigate state?

        Like

      • brni

        Re: Yeah for this social worker
        pennsylvania is a state that thinks that if tenants want different terms, they should have negotiated them before signing. PA has the same attitude toward employees – it is your responsibility as an individual employee to demand the terms you want from your prospective employer.
        on the other hand, the potential for victimization goes both ways with landlord-tenant law. if you decide not to pay your rent, it is an immensely long and expensive process to evict. so a tenant that wants to live somewhere and not pay rent can do so for a good 6 months or more before they can be evicted, and the only real recourse the landlord has is to trash the tenant’s credit rating. but a tenant that NEEDS to vacate can only do so with approval of the landlord, or they can go after your assets. it’s pretty fucked up.

        Like

  • jezebellydancer

    Oh, I’m so happy for you!.
    Let’s hope this is the beginning of the bureaucracy seeing reason. I go to court in two weeks.

    Like

  • zjman

    That’s incredible! I’m so happy for you. It’s good to know that there are still compassionate people out there.

    Like

You must be logged in to post a comment.

%d bloggers like this: